2024 Lamborghini Huracan Sterrato – Off Roader Supercar !!

Overview

Just take a look at the vehicle’s protruding fenders, the rally-inspired light pods grafted onto its pointed snout, the optional luggage rack and roof-mounted snorkel, as well as the strangest-appearing tyres ever put on a Huracán. This is obviously not your normal supercar. The Sterrato is primarily Max Rockatansky, with a little bit of Bruce Wayne. This is the only Lamborghini since the LM002 to wear dirt nicely. A little bit of elegance, all savage. (Lamborghini Huracan Sterrato)

Porsche did not create the Sterrato as a result of turning the 911 into an off-road buggy for the Dakar. The technical team at Lamborghini first came up with the idea in 2017, just after finishing up development on the Urus, when they saw there was still more potential in the LP610-4 all-wheel-drive chassis. Why not install longer electronically controlled dampers, softer springs, and softer anti-roll bars to give it 1.7 inches more ground clearance than the Evo and allow for greater articulation? They’ll come if you build it, they say.

They poured in as well. Even before anybody got a chance to drive one, the Sterrato quickly gained popularity. Despite a $278,972 retail price, Lamborghini would construct 1499 vehicles in total, all of which were promptly sold out. The adventure of the Huracán came to an end.

As in other Huracáns that came before it, the captivating 5.2-liter V-10, which has a ferocious symphony as 10 pistons pump and 40 titanium valves suck and blast air, continues to be the heart and soul of the Sterrato. The V-10 in the Sterrato produces 602 horsepower, which is a decrease of 29 horsepower over the same engine in the earlier STO and Tecnica models. Huracáns have previously sucked air into the intakes through apertures in front of the rear wheels. It should come as no surprise that low air intakes are a bad choice when you’re stirring up dust and debris. The rooftop snorkel, which was formerly utilised on the STO to flow air through the engine compartment and is now acting as the Sterrato’s windpipe, is Lamborghini’s solution.

Huracan Sterrato: Specs

Lamborghini Huracán Sterrato from 2024
Mid-engine, all-wheel drive, two-door coupe, two passengers

Base Price: $278,972

DOHC 40-valve V-10 engine with aluminium heads and block, port injection, and fuel injection
5204 cm3, 318 in3 of displacement
602 horsepower at 8000 revs.
413 lb-ft of torque at 6500 rpm

7-speed dual-clutch automatic gearbox

DIMENSIONS
Wheelbase: 103.5 inches, Dimensions: 178.1 inches, 77.0 inches, Height: 49.1 inches, Curb Weight: 3650 lb (C/D approx.

Performace (C/D EST)
3.0 sec. at 60 mph
6.0 sec at 100 mph
1/4 mile in 10.9 seconds
Speed Record: 162 mph

Fuel economy estimates from the EPA
Combined, City, and Highway MPG: 14/12/17

Huracan Sterrato: Drive

Although the Sterrato has improved approach, breakover, and departure angles, Chuckwalla Valley Raceway doesn’t really care about any of it. The front straight is destroyed by the off-road wedge. The Sterrato, equipped with Bridgestone all-terrain tyres (more on them later), twerks its way into Turn 1 as soon as you step on the solid, if a little sensitive, brake pedal that controls the standard carbon-ceramic brakes. When leaving Turn 3, the tyres cry for mercy under load, and Sport mode permits plenty of sideways movement. We won’t enter Turn 4 today; instead, we’ll switch the steering-wheel toggle to Rally mode and go into the scorching desert.

While willingly driving the Sterrato into the sand feels odd, a rapid, fixed-ratio steering rack is an all-star for setting up a Scandinavian film with a left-right twist of the fuzzy steering wheel. Rear-axle steering would have complicated the vehicle dynamics when combined with the all-terrain tyres, hence Lamborghini decided against it for this model. Without it, the Haldex all-wheel-drive system shifts torque between the axles, the brake-based torque vectoring pivots the vehicle, the earth buckles, and dirt envelops the six-figure rally car. With a pull of the large column-mounted shift paddles, the seven-speed dual-clutch automatic snaps off a gear change, and the Sterrato exits, leaving a dust plume reminiscent of the Road Runner.

The softer dampers and spring rates, along with longer and squishier internal bump stops, prevent the uprights from ejecting from the chassis while driving a Huracán over uneven terrain in third gear with an 8500-rpm redline. You’ll use all 6.4 inches of ground clearance if you choose the proper—or perhaps incorrect—path through the desert. The hood will be covered in dirt. Although this isn’t the stuff that prize trucks are made of, it’s nevertheless outstanding and delightfully entertaining for a pavement pounder.

Without the proper tyres, none of this could be accomplished. Lamborghini commissioned Bridgestone to create the Dueler All-Terrain AT002, an all-terrain tyre with a 168 mph speed rating that is exclusively compatible with the Sterrato. It is stiff because the sidewall structure is similar to that of a Bridgestone Potenza Sport summer tyre. The Dueler includes interlocking snipes and tie-bars to bind the tread blocks together to provide stability under load in addition to a tread pattern designed to remove pebbles and mud. Additionally, because it is a run-flat, the Sterrato can continue travelling for 50 miles at 50 mph in the case of a puncture. Furthermore, even though some would be tempted to place two spares on the roof rack, that load capacity is just 88 pounds.

Huracan Sterrato: Is It For Off-Road Only ?

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Putting aside the Sterrato’s off-road prowess, Lamborghini may have produced the greatest road-going Huracán to yet. This is the Huracán you’d want to drive across the nation because of how smooth it rides on the highway and how little noise the all-terrain tyres produce. More pitch and roll than any previous Huracán is present when attacking mountain switchbacks, and the steering is so light and fast that midcorner adjustments routinely happen unless you teach your hands to slow down. But none of that makes the experience less vivid. The Bridgestones definitely provide the most grip we’ve measured from all-terrain rubber when you lean on it really hard. And they’re not just for show with those fender flares.

With the exception of a digital inclinometer, a pitch-and-roll display, and GPS coordinates in the central display, the inside of the Sterrato is similar to that of earlier Huracáns. Its finest feature may be the ability to connect an Apple Watch and record your heartbeat. Additionally, using the Sterrato might make your heart skip a beat. In comparison to all the Huracán iterations that came before it, this Lamborghini is a significantly more exhilarating ride.

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